Can You Hear Me?

sucked_largeJust a non-time critical wee resource post for you on Audience Research.

As we’ll discuss in class, it is essential that you carry out audience research but what does that actually mean, and how do you/could you go about it?

First up for you to consider (and no, it’s not definitive, or even wholly relevant per se) is this Slide Deck…

It gives a fair overview of some of the questions you will be tackling and also some hints about things you could do.

Next up is the ESF Media Page on Audience Research Methods. Lots to read through and you’ll have no excuses for not having any ideas after a look at it:

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Clicky Picky Fory Linky…

And lastly… don’t forget your notes/handouts. Think posters. Think McDonalds. Think USPs. Think ‘why did I not pay attention last time’. Think ‘Will I get taken to a post with some diagrams I should remember and understand if I click these words in bold type.‘ (Hint: Yes)

PS: This. It’s useful. But only if you click the link and read it. #justsaying

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What’s The Story, Balamory?

Time to get busy while I’m in the hospital getting my picture taken. 🙂

As we started discussing in class today, you need to have the discussion about which story you are developing into the final film. Remember… you need to consider what elements you can/can’t use in your film, and you should also be story-boarding bits in preparation for the next stages…

Get busy, and I’ll be back tomorrow 🙂 (Click the pic to get the slides!)

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I’ll Be Brief…

"Noooo!!!! Why did I have the beans for lunch..."
“Noooo!!!! Why did I have the beans for lunch…”

🙂 Hopefully you’re clear on this first stage of the Production… if not, ASK! I’ve added a copy of the Brief to this post, and I know most of you can read, so I’ll not repeat anything here. What I will say is that you need to be willing and able to justify any and all decisions, and in doing so, you need to draw on the coursework we are covering with regards Narrative Structures (ie: how you are choosing to tell your story), your Plot (which of Booker’s 7 Plots you are going to use), and the Characters you will introduce/use (ie: Propp is your pal!)…

You’re not daft, so you’ll be aware that there is much more to it than this, but that’s enough to get you off and running. We’ll return to exclusively looking at your production next Thursday as we’ll need to consider Audience for the first part of the week.

One Thing…

Start doing research! Think of the style/genre/movie you want to make. Can you find examples of existing media that you can emulate? It might be the style of a whole film or TV show (like Stranger Things), or perhaps just an individual scene/incident… what ever it is, make a note/find a link and be ready to share with the rest of your group/class. It’s one of those great subjects where it really is easier to show someone rather than tell them…

Anyway… HERE’s Da Brief! (See… I is down wit’ da kidz…)

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Planning Maps

Just a quick upload today. One you’ve seen, the other is what we’ll be looking at tomorrow.

First up is the outline planning map you should use to consider what your product/brand represents. It’s fairly straight-forward, and the McD example we looked at in class should help you make sense of it.

Compass McMap.002

Remember, this map is useful for getting to grips with what it is you are going to produce. It is NOT map for your product… that’s this one:

Compass McMap.006

This will be the focus for tomorrow’s lesson. If you have time, I’d recommend clicking through on it and looking at it full size so you can see the small print.

There are 8 separate areas to consider and cover when you create your product (and note, though the example I’ll used is for an advertising poster, these are applicable no matter which media product you choose), and each becomes an area that you will need to know for the final exam (and, the prelim, of course!). A quick guide follows:

  1. Purpose/Target Audience: What is the product for, and who is it intended to be consumed by?
  2. Research: Find out what is already out there.
  3. Internal/External Factors: Internal factors relate to the (for example) iconography/expectations of the brand and/or product. External factors are relevant regulations/laws over what you can or can’t say and do in your product.
  4. Media/Genre: What are you producing and where will it be consumed.
  5. Content: Choosing what goes into your product.
  6. Tone/Style: Decisions on the format and look of the product.
  7. Cultural codes: What elements appropriate to the focus will be included.
  8. Technical codes: Decisions on the technical act of creating your product.

Hopefully, you already have a good grasp of these concepts, but we’ll be working through an example in class before getting you to develop your own product.

As ever, feel free to ask questions in the comments or in class. 🙂