IMDB Quick Research Guide

Hi class…

Just a quick step-by-step to finding things on IMDB. 🙂

  1. Go to IMDB.com (duh!)

2. Search for the film you are researching:

3. Er… look. You’ve found the page! 

4. Scroll down the page until you see “Company Credits”. Click “See more >>” to get fuller details.

5. The first part of this section (Production Companies) tells you who actually produced (made) the film. As a general guide, more production companies usually suggest a smaller/independent film. The risk is spread across more people, and they each put up less money in the first place.

P.S. Consider the difference between Atomic Blonde‘s list of production companies with Cars 3

You can often find more information about the film on Wikipedia, or a film’s official website, or newspaper articles, or Rotten Tomatoes, or… well, you get the idea! 🙂

Next up will be a wee bit help with part 2 of the homework. In the meantime, don’t forget to sign up for Edmodo.com.

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Internal/External

Just a wee note to help you and that came as a result of a question…

In essence:
Internal factors relate to choices the producer makes for their own reasons or that they have control over. (e.g.: Band image/producer’s target audience/casting/budget/etc)
External factors relate to things outwith the control of the producer but which the producer has to bear in mind such as Codes of Practice (from CAP), working conditions must comply with relevant legislation (e.g.: Health and Safety), regulatory bodies (e.g.: BBFC/ASA/the Law!),  and so on…
In general terms, when you made the poster, you had internal factors to consider such as actors (who you have control over), budget, software, lighting, equipment, etc… but while making it, you have also had to be aware of (and possibly made changes to comply with) external factors such as making sure your poster is legal, decent, honest and truthful… etc.
So in short… an internal factor is one that a producer controls, and external factor is one that someone else controls… yes, they sometimes cross over, but keep it simple… stick with the obvious!

Final example from PQD:

Internal: The producers choose the cast (Terence Stamp)
External: The BBFC issue the classification certificate (15)
And a cross over: The producers approve the script (and allow bad words) which is an internal factor but as a result of their decisions, the BBFC give it a 15 certificate which is an external factor.

And We’re Back! Research Time…

So, time to get busy. The links you will need to chase up are as follows:

And that’s plenty to be going on with!

 

 

 

 

Institutions: Part The First

screen-shot-2016-09-12-at-20-42-13Ok folks… the slides are the full set including some rather important things we haven’t covered yet but need to for the product (so feel free to read through them and be ready with questions)…

Click on the clown to download them..

Don’t get too worried about memorising the various Laws at the moment, the key thing at this stage is to be aware that there are Acts and organisations that influence media production and products… We’ll be covering them in a case study later in the course. 🙂

kids-club-phoenix-bbfcOne thing I do recommend you do is familiarise yourselves with the very excellent BBFC website… and possibly get the free BBFC app (iOS or Android). The BBFC have a very pragmatic and honest approach to film classification and you will learn a LOT simply by taking some time to look through the site. If you’re looking for a way to get started, try picking a film you know and see what the BBFC have said about it. The BBFC Insight is an excellent overview of the thinking behind a particular film’s rating… though be warned: SPOILER ALERTS AHOY!

To be fair, the BBFC will warn you when you’re headed into spoiler territory, but still…

Finally, if you didn’t get the chance in class, do have a go at trying to Rate A Trailer yourself. 🙂

Institution (Waltz?)

Obscure prog rock reference aside, I’ve just had a query about Institution and PQD.

Most of the information you need is on the slides, but for clarity, the most important things to remember are:

Stamp PQD PriscillaCasting: Terence Stamp (Wikipedia, IMDB, Guardian interview) would have appealed to an international audience as the big ‘name’ in the cast.

Hugo Weaving, Guy Pearce and Bill Hunter would appeal to the home Australian audience… (Incidentally, click through on the links, especially Bill Hunter’s as it’s an interview from 1994 so fits in nicely with society… and also how casting can work)

Get the casting right, you pull in an audience, your film makes money… or more importantly, your message gains an audience…

Production: What would have been the challenges of producing PQD? Especially at that point in history and against the prevailing social background (fear of AIDS, homosexuality was still frowned upon, and so forth)… would it have been easy to get the necessary finance for the film without the likes of Stamp/Hunter on board?

Look at the respective credits for the two main producers, Al Clark and Michael Hamlyn. One has a background in drama (including the critically acclaimed adaptation of 1984), the other is known for music videos… how might these backgrounds have helped producing PQD?

The production companies involved include the New South Wales Film & Television Office who have a specific remit to promote film-making and as such help subsidise ‘edgier’ subject matter.

Marketing: Look again at the 5 posters for the film included in the slides… can you see how each is designed to appeal to a different audience (mostly through the choice of anchorage — either quotes form reviews, or specific blurbs). This is all part of creating a ‘buzz’ around the film, and so encouraging people to want to go and see it.

Finally… read this Guardian article about the 20th Anniversary of Priscilla. It contains this rather useful paragraph that neatly sums up PQD’s main message and why the film was so important:

“That’s just what his country needs,” Bernadette scoffs. “A cock in a frock on a rock.” And, actually, that was just what the country needed: an intelligent and entertaining Australian film that embraces LGBT culture without turning turning a quintessentially personal story into an exercise in outrage-pedalling and button-pushing.

Being realistic, Institution is unlikely to be the stem for Q1, but if you swot up on the above, you would be able to tackle it if it did. 🙂

PS: Don’t overlook the money

PPS: Check your spelling!

  • Stephan Elliott
  • The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (PQD)
  • 1994
  • Australia

PPPS: The aria is called Sempre Libera, it’s from Verdi’s La Traviata and the translation of the lyrics is as follows:

Free and aimless I frolic
From joy to joy,
Flowing along the surface
of life’s path as I please.
As the day is born,
Or as the day dies,
Happily I turn to the new delights
That make my spirit soar.

Love is a heartbeat throughout the universe,
mysterious, altering,
the torment and delight of my heart.

Oh! Oh! Love!
Madness! Euphoria!

If that doesn’t sum up Adam/Felicia/Guy Pearce’s character, then what does! 😉

PPPPS: Can you tell I’m going OTT as I want you all to do well?

BBFC Prep

Banner-Image-2014---06-12-12AIn preparation for tomorrow’s lesson, you could do worse than familiarise yourselves with the BBFC website. In particular, you should check out the guidance for the following ratings: U, PG, 12 and 12A and 15.

There is also an excellent Education section which has loads of useful resources and information, including an opportunity for you to ‘Rate a Trailer‘… which is an exercise that will provide immense use to you as you finish your own! (Hint! Hint!)